Personal hardware maker projects using a variety of components such as Arduino Compatibles, Raspberry Pi, Neopixels (& generic WS2812 RGB LEDs), or 3D printed components designed in Blender.
Light Bar Trio
Light Bar Trio
A practical implementation of a light controlled via HeavenLi. Structural parts consist of an 8 foot (~2.4m) piece of extruded aluminum straddled with 3D printed elements. The 3D-printed end caps and "sliders" secure to the aluminum with a single computer fan screw. The rings running along hide seams where two symmetric slider halves meet. The lighting elements consist of three neutral white LED strips and 120 Adafruit NeoPixel LEDs. The white LED strips supplement more natural white tones to less-than-fully saturated colors. The white LED strips were salvaged from reclaimed outdoor architectural lighting. The NeoPixel LEDs were cut/mended into three sections and adhered onto aluminum heatsinks with thermal. The system is powered with a reclaimed laptop power supply that provides around 65W at 19.5V. The white LED strips are powered directly from the 19.5V source and faded with PWM-signaled NPN transistors via the controller. A Pololu 5V 9A buck-regulator safely powers all of the NeoPixel LEDs. It is fixed on one endcap and equipped with aluminum heatsinks for improved efficiency at high power draws. The controller initially was an Arduino Uno clone (-ish, Adafruit Metro mini), but after a weekend of debugging, I've found the Atmega328p (the main chip of the Uno) can't really drive NeoPixels while also receiving commands from HeavenLi over serial. The current implementation uses an Arduino Leonard clone (-ish, Adafruit ItsyBitsy 32u4 5V), since the Atmega32u4 features an onboard usb-to-serial converter and thus has no problems driving the NeoPixels while also sending/receiving serial data. All 3D-printed parts were designed in Blender. All aluminum heatsinks were ordered from heatsinkusa.com.
Keyboard
Keyboard
This is my keyboard. It is built from a Ducky Shine III (Cherry MX Brown) with magenta keyswitch LEDs. All of the keycaps are double-shot PBT and dampened with thick transparent O-rings. Each and every individual keyswitch is hand lubricated for a much smoother typing experience. The frame is padded with iron adhesive weights with adhesive foam to dampen and absorb micro-vibrations caused by typing. I designed the frame, door, wrist-rest, and controller box in Blender then 3D printed with PLA. Just about all of the pieces are fastened with typical computer fan screws, 150+. The LED lightbars use Adafruit NeoPixel LED strips. The dev board that controls the lighting and door mechanism is the Adafruit Metro (an Arduino Uno clone). The round knob on the front tweaks the color of the lightbars. The whole exterior frame uses a 60 watt power brick to keep the LEDs and motor properly powered. The actual keyboard itself is still USB-powered and functions normally even if the frame has no power.
Side Panel
Side Panel
This is the side-panel to my desktop computer. It is made with reclaimed tempered glass, an aluminum machine bar and 3D printed everything else. All 3D printed components were designed in Blender. The window features an LCD panel to display semi-transparent graphics. A Raspberry Pi Zero W plays a video loop on the window panel and a Teensy 3.5 drives the RGB LEDS.
Omnikey
Omnikey
This is a retrofit of a Northgate Computer Systems Omnikey Plus (manufactured June 2nd, 1989). I received this keyboard as a gift from a family; it had been sitting in storage for a while so it needed a little TLC. This Omnikey model featured a set of DIP-switches to configure compatibility with a variety of different computers on the market at the time. The key switches are genuine original ALPs and the keycaps are double-shot PBT. I used a Teensy 2.0 to convert the PS/2 signal to USB.
Magic Mirror
Magic Mirror
This project was my attempt to design a simple UI for a magic mirror. The project was built with an old 1440*900 monitor, a piece of acrylic with two-way reflective film applied, and a Raspberry Pi 2 to run the interface. The interface itself, simply called "MirrorUI," was written in Processing (https://processing.org). The forecast was provided by openweathermap.org, and at least four different fonts were used for different elements on screen. The code for this project is available at ( https://github.com/iyr/mirrorUI ) This project has since been dismantled.
  • 2017-12-16 2017-12-16
  • 2016-11-25 07.58.08 2016-11-25 07.58.08
  • (click to play clip) Demonstration of the motorized cover (click to play clip) Demonstration of the motorized cover
  • 2017-09-25 2017-09-25
  • 2017-09-12 2017-09-12
  • The Northgate Computer Systems OmniKey Plus The Northgate Computer Systems OmniKey Plus
  • 2019-02-05 2019-02-05